Badgers

Badgers are sturdy, strongly built mustelids which are primarily found in the Northern Hemisphere, but also have species populating South Africa and Indonesia. All extant species live in burrows called setts, though their usage differs between species with some living in family groups and others living predominantly solitary lives.

Badger species often have strong forelimbs suited for digging, with long curved claws ideal for breaking up dirt. Though in some species such as ferret-badgers, this is not as prominent despite the fact that they still exhibit digging behavior. Badgers are nocturnal, and come out during the night to feed on a variety of different food sources, such as worms, grubs, small mammals, reptiles and birds; but also feeding on berries, roots and fruit.

One feature that is found in all species of badger is distinct facial markings – darker colours contrasting with light. This is the feature which gave rise to a now old fashioned name for badgers; Bauson, which is a variation on the word Bausond, which refers to piebald markings, whilst also being used to describe a badger’s face.

(1) American Badger (Taxidea taxus)

Photo by Yathin S Krishnappa

The American badger is a North American badger, somewhat similar in appearance to the European badger. It is found in the western and central United States, northern Mexico, and south-central Canada to certain areas of southwestern British Columbia.

Conservation Status: Least Concern

– Source from Wikipedia. The information above needs to be edited with our own words.

(2) Asian Badger (Meles leucurus)

Photo by Zoosnow

The Asian badger, also known as the sand badger is a species of badger native to Mongolia, China, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, the Korean Peninsula and Russia.

Conservation Status: Least Concern

– Source from Wikipedia. The information above needs to be edited with our own words.

(3) European Badger (Meles meles)

Photo by Kallerna

The European badger also known as the Eurasian badger or simply badger, is a species of badger native to almost all of Europe and some parts of West Asia. Several subspecies are recognized; the nominate subspecies predominates over most of Europe.

Conservation Status: Least Concern

– Source from Wikipedia. The information above needs to be edited with our own words.

(4) Japanese Badger (Meles anakuma)

Photo by Nzrst1jx

The Japanese badger is a species of carnivoran. Endemic to Japan, it is found on Honshu, Kyushu, Shikoku, and Shodoshima. It shares the genus Meles with the Asian and European badgers. In Japan it is called by the name nihonanaguma, lit. “Japan hole-bear”.

Conservation Status: Least Concern

– Source from Wikipedia. The information above needs to be edited with our own words.




Although the following are called badgers, hog-badgers and ferret-badgers, they are not closely related to the badgers above.

(5) Bornean Ferret-Badger (Melogale everetti) – Genus Melogale

Photo credit unknown.

The Bornean ferret-badger, also known as Everett’s ferret-badger or the Kinabalu ferret-badger, is only known with certainty from the highland forests on Mount Kinabalu and nearby regions in Sabah, Malaysia, but is suspected to occur elsewhere on Borneo, including Brunei, Kalimantan (to Indonesia) and Sarawak (to Malaysia).

Conservation Status: Endangered

– Source from Wikipedia. The information above needs to be edited with our own words.

(6) Burmese Ferret-Badger (Melogale personata) – Genus Melogale

Photo credit unknown.

The Burmese ferret-badger has a head and body length of 35–40 centimetres (14–16 in), a tail length of 15–21 centimetres (5.9–8.3 in) and a body weight of 1.5–3 kilograms (3.3–6.6 lb). The fur ranges from fawn brown to dark brown, with a white dorsal stripe. The face is marked with black and white patches, which are unique to each individual. The rear part of the tail is whitish.

Conservation Status: Least Concern

– Source from Wikipedia. The information above needs to be edited with our own words.

(7) Chinese Ferret-Badger (Melogale moschata) – Genus Melogale

Photo by Николай Усик 

The Chinese ferret-badger, also known as the small-toothed ferret-badger is  widely distributed in Southeast Asia.

Conservation Status: Least Concern

– Source from Wikipedia. The information above needs to be edited with our own words.

(8) Hog Badger (Arctonyx collaris) – Genus Arctonyx

Photo by Rushenb

The hog badger, also known as greater hog badger, is a terrestrial mustelid native to Central and Southeast Asia. It is listed as Vulnerable in the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species because the global population is thought to be declining due to high levels of poaching.

Conservation Status: Vulnerable

– Source from Wikipedia. The information above needs to be edited with our own words.

(9) Honey Badger (Mellivora capensis)

Photo by Aleutia. Listed under fair use.

The honey badger, also known as the ratel, is the only species in the mustelid subfamily Mellivorinae and its only genus Mellivora. It is native to Africa, Southwest Asia, and the Indian subcontinent

Conservation Status: Least Concern

– Source from Wikipedia. The information above needs to be edited with our own words.

(10) Javan Ferret-Badger (Melogale orientalis) – Genus Melogale

Photo by Kispál Attila

The Javan ferret-badger is endemic to Java and Bali, Indonesia. It is listed as Least Concern on the IUCN Red List and occurs from at least 260 to 2,230 m elevation in or close to forested areas.

Conservation Status: Least Concern

– Source from Wikipedia. The information above needs to be edited with our own words.

(11) Vietnam Ferret-Badger (Melogale cucphuongensis) – Genus Melogale

Photo by Elke Schwierz

The Vietnam ferret-badger is native to Vietnam. It was described in 2011 and is known from only two specimens.

Conservation Status: Data Deficient

– Source from Wikipedia. The information above needs to be edited with our own words.





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