Martens

Martens are a slender, often arboreal species that mainly populate forested areas in the northern hemisphere. They vary in size and shape, yet all have defining features that link them; such as semi retractable claws (which is unique within the mustelid family), long tails that often match their body length, and adaptations to the joints in their wrists and legs to help them climb down trees headfirst without issue.

Their behavior tends to lean towards an arboreal lifestyle. It can however, be misunderstood that they only live within trees and do all their feeding in this environment; which is not the case, as martens are known to hunt and forage both on land and within trees. Martens have varied eating habits that change as the seasons do, having a more berry and fruit orientated diet in the summer months and a more meat filled diet in the winter months.

Martens are a mostly solitary species, but can be seen in small family groups. They do seem to tolerate each other’s company if food sources are particularly rich in some areas.

(1) American Marten (Martes americana)

Photo by Cody Connor

The American marten or American pine marten is a North American member of the family. The name “pine marten” is derived from the common but distinct Eurasian species of Martes. It differs from the fisher in that it is smaller in size and lighter in colour.

Size: 32-45 cm / 13-17 in (males)
Weight: 280-1,300 g / 9.9 – 45.9 oz (males)
Average Lifespan: 6 years
Range: Northern North America, Rocky Mountains and Sierra Nevada.
Conservation Status: Least Concern

– Source from Wikipedia. The information above needs to be edited with our own words.

(2) Beech Marten (Martes foina)

Photo by Zefram

The beech marten, also known as the stone marten, house marten or white breasted marten, is a species of marten native to much of Europe and Central Asia, though it has established a feral population in North America.

The beech marten is present in Wisconsin, particularly near the urban centres surrounding Milwaukee. It is also present in several wooded, upland areas in the Kettle Moraine State Forest, and in nearby woodlands of Walworth, Racine, Waukesha and probably Jefferson Counties. North American beech martens are likely descended from feral animals that escaped a private fur farm in Burlington during the 1940s. They have also been listed as being released or having escaped in 1972.

Conservation Status: Least Concern

– Source from Wikipedia. The information above needs to be edited with our own words.

(3) European Pine Marten (Martes martes)

Photo by SurreyJohn

The European pine marten is an animal native to Northern Europe. Their bodies are up to 53 cm (21 in) in length, and their bushy tails can be 25 cm (10 in). Males are slightly larger than females; typically, martens weigh around 1.5 kg (3.3 lb). Their fur is usually light to dark brown and grows longer and silkier during the winter. They have a cream- to yellow-coloured “bib” marking on their throats.

Conservation Status: Least Concern

– Source from Wikipedia. The information above needs to be edited with our own words.

(4) Japanese Marten (Martes melampus)

Photo by てん

The Japanese marten is a mammal in the marten genus most closely related to the sable. It is 0.5 m in length typically, not counting a 20-cm-long tail, and between 1,000 and 1,500 grams in weight. Males are generally larger than females.

Conservation Status: Least Concern

– Source from Wikipedia. The information above needs to be edited with our own words.

(5) Nilgiri Marten (Martes gwatkinsii)

Photo by: Navaneeth Kishor

The Nilgiri marten is the only species of marten found in southern India. It occurs in the hills of the Nilgiris and parts of the Western Ghats.

Conservation Status: Vulnerable

– Source from Wikipedia. The information above needs to be edited with our own words.

(6) Pacific Marten (Martes caurina)

Photo by Tim Gage

The Pacific marten is a mysterious creature that lurks in remote slivers of dense forests in coastal Oregon and northern California. It is very similar to the American marten, but is believed they may be their own species.

Conservation Status: Least Concern

– Source from Wikipedia. The information above needs to be edited with our own words.

(7) Sable (Martes zibellina)

Photo by: Е.Медведева

The sable is a carnivorous mammal that inhabits northern Europe and parts of northern Asia. Being about 18 inches long, the sable can be black or dark brown with grey on the head, and tawny on the throat and under parts. Having broad, covered with dense hair paws, the sable can climb trees well, though it prefers to prey on the ground, hunting various rodents and birds.

It also can eat fish and carrion, as well as berries and cedar nuts. Its close relations are the pine and stone marten.

Size: 32 to 51 cm (13 to 20 inches) in length.
Weight: 0.9-1.8 kilograms.
Range: Most of Asia and northeastern Europe.
Conservation Status: Least Concern

(8) Yellow-Throated Marten (Martes flavigula)

Photo by: Thai National Parks

The yellow-throated marten is an Asian marten species, which is listed as Least Concern on the IUCN Red List due to its wide distribution, evidently relatively stable population, occurrence in a number of protected areas, and lack of major threats.

Conservation Status: Least Concern

– Source from Wikipedia. The information above needs to be edited with our own words.

 


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