Otters

Otters are carnivorous mammals in the subfamily Lutrinae. The 13 extant otter species are all semiaquatic, aquatic or marine, with diets based on fish and invertebrates.

– Source from Wikipedia. The information above needs to be edited with our own words.

(1) African Clawless Otter (Aonyx capensis)

Photo by Mark Paxton of Shamvura Camp

The African clawless otter, also known as the Cape clawless otter or groot otter, is the second-largest freshwater species of otter. African clawless otters are found near permanent bodies of water in savannah and lowland forest areas.

Conservation Status: Near Threatened

– Source from Wikipedia. The information above needs to be edited with our own words.

(2) Asian Small-Clawed Otter (Aonyx cinereus)

Photo by Moody Ferret

The Asian small-clawed otter, also known as the oriental small-clawed otter or simply small-clawed otter, is a semiaquatic mammal native to South and Southeast Asia. It is the smallest otter species in the world.

Conservation Status: Vulnerable

– Source from Wikipedia. The information above needs to be edited with our own words.

(3) Eurasian Otter (Lutra lutra)

Photo by Bernard Landgraf

The Eurasian otter, also known as the European otter, Eurasian river otter, common otter, and Old World otter, is a semiaquatic mammal native to Eurasia.

Conservation Status: Near Threatened

– Source from Wikipedia. The information above needs to be edited with our own words.

(4) Congo Clawless Otter (Aonyx congicus)

Photo by IOSF1957

The Congo clawless otter is a subspecies of the African clawless otter, but is considered to be a separate species by the IUCN Otter Specialist Group.

Congo clawless otters are characterized by only partial webbing (between the toes of their black feet and no webbing on their front feet), and small, blunt, peg-like claws. They have very sensitive forepaws, which they use for foraging. Other otters have fully webbed feet and strong, well-developed claws. Clawless otters have slender, serpentine bodies with dense, luxurious fur and long tails. All otters have been exploited for their thick, velvety fur. Their head and body length measure to be about 600-1,000 mm (24–39 in.), and their tail length is between 400 and 710 mm (16–28 in.). These large otters can weigh between 14 and 34 kg (31 and 75 lb).

Conservation Status: Near Threatened

– Source from Wikipedia. The information above needs to be edited with our own words.

(5) Giant Otter (Pteronura brasiliensis)

Photo by Calle Eklund/V-wolf

The giant otter or giant river otter is a South American carnivorous mammal. It is the longest member of the family Mustelidae, reaching up to 1.7 metres.

Conservation Status: Endangered

– Source from Wikipedia. The information above needs to be edited with our own words.

(6) Hairy-Nosed Otter (Lutra sumatrana)

Photo by Wildlife Alliance

The hairy-nosed otter is a semiaquatic mammal endemic to Southeast Asia and one of the rarest and least known otter species. It is threatened by loss of natural resources and poaching.

Conservation Status: Endangered

– Source from Wikipedia. The information above needs to be edited with our own words.

(7) Marine Otter (Lontra felina)

Photo by Sakura1994

The marine otter is a rare and poorly known South American mammal. The scientific name means “otter cat”, and in Spanish, the marine otter is also often referred to as gato marino: “marine cat”.

Conservation Status: Endangered

– Source from Wikipedia. The information above needs to be edited with our own words.

(8) Neotropical Otter (Lontra longicaudis)

Photo by Carla Antonini

The neotropical otter or neotropical river otter is an otter species found in Central America, South America and the island of Trinidad. It is physically similar to the northern and southern river otter, which occur directly north and south of this species’ range.

Conservation Status: Near Threatened

– Source from Wikipedia. The information above needs to be edited with our own words.

(9) North American River Otter (Lontra canadensis)

Photo by Moody Ferret

The North American river otter, also known as the northern river otter or the common otter, is a semiaquatic mammal endemic to the North American continent found in and along its waterways and coasts.

Conservation Status: Least Concern

– Source from Wikipedia. The information above needs to be edited with our own words.

(10) Sea Otter (Enhydra lutris)

Photo by Moody Ferret

The sea otter is a marine mammal native to the coasts of the northern and eastern North Pacific Ocean.

Conservation Status: Endangered

– Source from Wikipedia. The information above needs to be edited with our own words.

(11) Smooth-Coated Otter (Lutrogale perspicillata)

Photo by Mike Prince | Original

The smooth-coated otter is the only extant representative of the genus Lutrogale. The species is found in most of the Indian subcontinent and eastwards to Southeast Asia, with a disjunct population in Iraq.

Conservation Status: Vulnerable

– Source from Wikipedia. The information above needs to be edited with our own words.

(12) Southern River Otter (Lontra provocax)

Photo by Paul Tavares

The southern river otter lives in Chile and Argentina. Although called a “river otter”, it inhabits both marine and freshwater environments. It sometimes is considered a subspecies of Lontra canadensis.

Conservation Status: Endangered

– Source from Wikipedia. The information above needs to be edited with our own words.

(13) Spotted-Necked Otter (Hydrictis maculicollis)

Photo by derekkeats | Original

The spotted-necked otter, or speckle-throated otter, is an otter native to sub-Saharan Africa.

Conservation Status: Near Threatened

– Source from Wikipedia. The information above needs to be edited with our own words.




American MinkBadgers | Ferrets & Polecats | Fisher | Grisons | Martens | Otters | Stoats & Weasels | Tayra | Wolverine